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SIMMONS COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 



SIMMONS COLLEGE 

THE 1908 CLASS BOOK 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/microcosm1908simm 



SIMMONS COLLEGE 

The igo8 Class Book 




Boston 

PUBLISHED BY THE CLASS 

1908 



COPYRIGHT, 1908, BY LOUISE HOLYOKE HAZARD 






D. B. UPDIKE, THE MER11YMOUNT PRESS, BOSTON 




\ 



TO OUR PRESIDENT 

HENRY LEFAVOUR 

WE DEDICATE THIS BOOK 



I 16 % 



PREFACE 

In the preparation of this book the Board of Editors has considered two things 
to be essential ; first that it should be complete, and second, that the material 
used should be permanent in value. It has been the effort of the Board to pre- 
pare a book of reference, rather than one which might cause amusement at its 
first reading, but possess no further interest. For this reason it was deemed 
wise to omit the Will and Prophecy, and insert, in their stead, records and 
additional photographs. Material which is indicative of the life of the Class, 
and which could not well be reviewed on Class Day, is, so far as is possible, 
included. 

The Board would thank Miss Margaret Havens, Miss Lucy Church, and 
Miss Marion Jones for their services on the Quotation Committee ; it would 
thank Mr. D. B. Updike, of the Merrymount Press, for his personal super- 
vision and advice; and it would gratefully acknowledge the constant as- 
sistance given it by Professor Frank Edgar Farley, without whose aid the 
book in its present form could not have been presented. 

Louise Holyoke Hazard, Editor-in-chief 

Martha Wentworth Suefren, Associate Editor 

Emily Ambler Clarke, Art Editor 

Ruth Kellogg, Assistant Editor 

Theodora Kimball, Assistant Editor 

Anna Elizabeth Monahan, Business Manager 



[9 ] 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

THE FACULTY 15 

OFFICERS OF THE CLASS OF 1908 23 

THE CLASS • 23 

CLASS HISTORY 53 

CLASS PICTURE 57 

CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 5,0 

FORMER MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1908 60 

PROGRAMME FOR COMMENCEMENT WEEK 62 

THE STUDENT GUILD 65 

THE COLLEGE HYMN 66 

GLEE CLUB 67 

MANDOLIN CLUB 68 

TENNIS CLUB 6g 

OUR DORMITORIES 70 

VIEWS OF COLLEGE BUILDINGS 71 

VERSE 73 

GRINDS 78 



[11 ] 



THE FACULTY AND THE CLASS 



THE FACULTY 

HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., President 





SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, A.M. 
DEAN 



JAMES FLACK NORRIS, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY 




FRANK EDGAR FARLEY, Ph.D. 

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH 
HONORARY MEMBER OF THE CLASS OF 1908 




ALFRED BULL NICHOLS, A.B. 
PROFESSOR OF GERMAN 



[ 15 ] 





JEFFREY RICHARDSON BRACKETT, Ph.D. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF THE THEORY AND 

PRACTICE OF PHILANTHROPIC WORK 



REGINALD RUSDEN GOODELL, A.M. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ROMANCE LAN- 
GUAGES 





EDWARD HENRY ELDRIDGE, Ph.D. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SHORTHAND AND 

TYPEWRITING 



MARY ESTHER ROBB1NS 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 
HONORARY MEMBER OF THE CLASS OF 1908 



[ 17] 





MARIA WILLETT HOWARD 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HOUSEHOLD ECO- 
NOMICS 



KENNETH LAMARTINE MARK, Ph.D. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY 




LESLIE LYLE CAMPBELL, Ph.D. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS 




SUSAN MYRA KINGSBURY, Ph.D. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HISTORY' 

AND ECONOMICS 
HONORARY MEMBER OF THE CLASS OF 1908 



[ 19] 





MARY ELIZA PARKER, A.M. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF THE PRINCIPLES 

AND PRACTICE OF TEACHING 



PERCY GOLDTHWAIT STILES, Ph.D. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY 





HESTER CUNNINGHAM, A.B. 

INSTRUCTOR IN ENGLISH AND SECRETARY 

OF THE FACULTY 



HARRISON HITCHCOCK BROWN, Ph.D. 
INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICS (1904-1906) 

HONORARY MEiMBER OF THE CLASS OF 1908 



[ « ] 



OFFICERS OF THE CLASS OF 1908 



1904-5 

President, Jessie Moore 
Vice-President, Emma Punchard 
Secretary, Louise Andrews 
Treasurer, Marion Burrage 



* 



1905-6 

President, Jessie Moore 
Vice-President, Louise Holyoke Hazard 
Secretary, Martha Wentworth Suffren 
Treasurer, Margery Boylston 



1906-7 
President, Jessie Moore 
Vice-President, Beulah Clark Hatch 
Secretary, Dora B. Sherburne 
Treasurer, Hester Paige Fisher 



1907-8 
President, Alice M. Garland 
Vice-President, Margery Boylston 
Secretary, Marion Burrage 
Treasurer, Hester Paige Fisher 





JESSIE MOORE 

CLINTON, NEW YORK 

CLINTON HIGH SCHOOL, '03 

"A girl of mark ; 
Trust allied ninth truth, ease with dignity." 



ALICE M. GARLAND 
LEOMINSTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

LEOMINSTER HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

' For thou hast all the arts of fine persuasion. 



[ 23] 




ESTHER LOUISE ADAMS 

SOUTHBUIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

SOUTHBRIDGE HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

' Having infinite capacity for idealization." 




MERTIE M. BACHELDER 

LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 

LOWELL HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

" Of ready tact and nimble wit." 





STELLA SWEETSER BEAL 



ELIZA B. BIGELOW 



BROCKTON HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

' Jokes of all kinds, ready cut and dried." 



[ 25 ] 



noxuunv high school, '04 
" Love me, love my dog." 





E. MIRABEL BOUTWELL 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

AMHERST HIGH SCHOOL, '03 

" Thrifty and thoughtful of others." 



MARGERY BOYLSTON 
WILTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

WILTON HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

'She kept her line of rectitude 

With love's unconscious ease ; 
Her kindly instincts understood 
All gentle courtesies." 





ELIZABETH DAVIDSON BURLEIGH 

TAVARES, FLORIDA 

ROLLINS COLLEGE, 1903-1905 

" A woman's greatest power lies in serenity." 




GERTRUDE JANE BURNETT 

WETXESLEY, MASSACHUSETTS 
WELLESLEY HIGH SCHOOL, "04 

" I love to be merry and wise. 
To laugh and cajole icith a friend." 



[ 27 1 





MARION BURRAGE 



LANCASTER HIGH SCHOOL 

' Thy friend is always thy friend ; 
Not to have, nor to hold, nor to love, 
Nor to rejoice in ; but to remember." 



LUCY M. CHURCH 

TIVERTON, RHODE ISLAND 

B. M. C. DURFEE HIGH SCHOOL, FALL RIVER, '03 

''Her words of learned length and thundering sound, 
Amazed the gazing rustics rang'd around ; 
And still they gaz'd, and still the wonder grew, 
That one small head should carry all she knew." 





JENNIE ELIZABETH CATON 

FOXBORO, MASSACHUSETTS 

FOXBORO HIGH SCHOOL, '03 

' Hie generous fellowship of joy, the sympathy of 
grief." 



HELEN MADAELINE CALLAHAN 

SPENCER, MASSACHUSETTS 

DAVID PROUTY HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

" My heart is as light as a feather all day." 



[29] 



\ 




EMILY AMBLER CLARKE 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

CENTRAL HIGH SCHOOL, SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

" In framing an artist. Art hath thus decreed. 
To make some good, but others to exceed." 




ZILLA MAY CONSTABLE 

AUGUSTA, MAINE 
MILTON HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

"A young woman of a calm temper and 
modest deportment." 





MARION COX 

CANTON, OHIO 

WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY, 1904-1905 

'She's calm, deliberate, dignified, leisurely.' 



EDNA G. DONLAN 

JAMAICA PLAIN, MASSACHUSETTS 

WEST ROXHURY HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

" A judge in matters of taste." 



r si ] 



\ 





RUTH LANE EATON 
LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 

LOWELL HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

' If fortune, with a smiling face, 
Strew roses in our way. 
When shall ive stoop to pick them up t 
To-day, my love, to-day." 



MARION FRANCES FARRINGTON 

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

" Thy modesty 's a candle to thy merit." 




HESTER PAIGE FISHER 
GLOUCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

GLOUCESTER HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

"She is complete in feature and in mind. 
With all good grace to grace a woman." 




OLIVE LOUISE FISKE 

JAMAICA PLAIN, MASSACHUSETTS 

GIRLS' LATIN SCHOOL, BOSTON, '04 

"A kind and gentle heart she has." 



[ 33 ] 





MARY EVELYN FITZSIMMONS 

ROXBURY, MASSACHUSETTS 

ROXBURY HIGH SCHOOL, '03 

"Music is her natural bent." 



ANNIE LIZZIE FLAVELL 

MARSHF1EUD, MASSACHUSETTS 

MARSHFIELD HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

"Sloiv, but precious sure." 




LENA RUTH FRENCH 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE, 1904-1905 

' Whose wit, in the combat, as gentle as bright. 
Ne'er carried a heart-stain away on its blade." 





CORA CHAPIN GODDARD 

STANDISH, MASSACHUSETTS 

TOPEKA HIGH SCHOOL, TOPEKA, KANSAS, '03 

"Life is too short for mean anxieties." 



[35 ] 





BEULAH CLARK HATCH 
WOLLASTON, MASSACHUSE1TS 

WOODWARD INSTITUTE, QUINCY, MASS., '04 

"Impulsive, earnest, prompt to act. 
And make her generous thought a fact." 



MARGARET REMINGTON HAVENS 

NEWTON CENTRE, MASSACHUSETTS 

NEWTON HIGH SCHOOL 

"How dull it is to pause, to make an end. 
To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use ! 
As though to breathe were life." 





LOUISE HOLYOKE HAZARD 

MANCHESTER, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

SMITH COLLEGE, EX-'Ol 

"Sincerity 's my chief delight." 



ETHEL M. HEALD 
RUTLAND, MASSACHUSETTS 

CUSHING ACADEMY, '04 

'Behold ! her breakfasts shine with reputation. 
Her dinners are the loonders of the nation." 



[37 ] 



4 




GRACE LISCOM HEWITT 

CANTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

CANTON HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

" With a running pen." 




HELEN M. HILL 

MELROSE HIGHLANDS, MASSACHUSETTS 

MELROSE HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

"Deeming nothing to have been done 
if anything remained to do." 





EDITH FANNIE HOOD 

CHELSEA, VERMONT 

CHELSEA ACADEMY, '00 

"For she is just the quiet kind. 
Whose natures never vary." 



[39 ] 



LOUISE PHILLIPS HUNT 

WEYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

' Wisdom speaks little, but that little well." 





. 




MARIAN ELIZA JONES 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BRIGHTON HIGH SCHOOL, '01 

' I cannot say one thing and mean another." 



RUTH KELLOGG 

PITTSFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 
PITTSFIELD HIGH SCHOOL 

" Thou art a scholar," — 

"Read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest. 





THEODORA KIMBALL 
DORCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

GIRLS' LATIN SCHOOL, BOSTON, '04 
" Her fame was great in all the land." 



BEATRICE MARGERY LEVIAN 

DORCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

GIRLS' LATIN SCHOOL, BOSTON, '04 

" Who seeks a social life has business." 



[41 ] 






MARTHA C. LOWE 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

girls' HIGH SCHOOL, '03 

"A smooth and steadfast mind. 
Gentle thoughts, and calm desires." 



MARY WALKER MILLER 
LUDLOW, MASSACHUSETTS 

LUDLOW HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

' She is a scholar, and a right good one. 




ANNA ELIZABETH MONAHAN 
BROOKLINE, MASSACHUSETTS 

GIRLS' HIGH SCHOOL, BOSTON, '03 

"See me, how calm I am." 




SARAH LOUISE NORTHRUP 
LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS 

CLASSICAL HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

" Who would be no greater, nor fears to be less." 



[43 ] 




MARY COGSWELL PECKHAM 

JAMESTOWN, NEW YORK 

JAMESTOWN HIGH SCHOOL, '03 

"A girl she seems of cheerful yesterdays 
and confident to-morrows." 




HELEN WINIFRED RYDER 

BELLOWS FALLS, VERMONT 

BELLOWS FALLS HIGH SCHOOL, '0-i 

"She touched my hand with a s>nile so su-eet." 





DORA 13. SHERBURNE 
TYNGSBOKOUGH, MASSACHUSETTS 



LOWELL HIGH SCHOOI 



'04 



' A strong and healthy soil of common sense- 
Freshened by living springs of feeling." 



MARY SPALDING 

LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 

LOWELL HIGH SCHOOL, '0-1 

' Charming, and simple, and siceet. 



[ 45 ] 







LUCY SHERWOOD STEBBINS 

ROSLINDALE, MASSACHUSETTS 

WEST ROXBURY HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

" Candor is the seal of a noble mind." 




THERESA CRYSTAL STUART 



WELI.ESLEY COLLEGE, 1903-190-t 

' Brisk and lively as a bee, and worthy looking after ; 
No temper or sidks you'll meet in me, but fun and 
laughter." 



* I 



; 




i I 

HELEN AVIS STROUT 

WEST SOMERVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 
SOMEUVILLE LATIN SCHOOL, '03 

"Silence is a virtue." 




KATHERINE L. STEGMAIER 
PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL, '02 

"A thin, tall, upright, serious, slender maid. 



[47 ] 





MARTHA WENTWORTH SUFFREN 



PRATT INSTITUTE, '03 

" Pondering much and much contriving, 
How the tribes of men might prosper." 



FLORENCE C. SUTHERLAND 

DORCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

NORTHFIEI.D SEMINARY, '03 

" With entire seriousness." 





MARY J. SWEENEY 
DEDHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

DEDHA1M HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

' / know you are full of good nature." 



RUTH M. THOMAS 

D U X B U II V , M A SS ACHUS ETTS 

PEABODY HIGH SCHOOL, PEABODY, MASS., '04 

"Stubborn labor conquers everything." 



[ 49 1 





ETHEL M. WEBB 

HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 

HARTFORD PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL 

'Hail, social life ! Into thy pleasing bounds 
Again I come." 



PEARL LUELLA WOODWARD 

STONEHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

LOWELL HIGH SCHOOL, '04 

" With thee conversing, I forget all time." 




ETHEL GRACE WOOLDRIDGE 

MELROSE, MASSACHUSETTS 
MELROSE HIGH SCHOOL, '03 

'Nothing lovelier can be found in woman than to 
study household good." 



[51 ] 



THE CLASS HISTORY 

September 15, 1904 

I am the Class Shade, and these are my impressions to muse over when I am gray and 

toothless. 

I've come together from most everywhere. I looked in the fens opposite the College to see 

what I really was. It's always interesting to analyze, especially when you're the object. 

My hair seems to be dark brown — I wonder how long it will stay this way. I have dark 

eyes too, I am rather tall, and feel just about right. I have n't met the Sophomores, though. 

September 19 

I've never been through so much agony before in all my life. I've had to tell everything 
about myself that you can imagine — all the most insignificant details. Registering is surely 
a serious performance. 

September 22 

Our first Assembly to-day. It's fine — all singing. We've been welcomed so many times! 

I do wish I was n't a Freshman. They all hope that we shall enjoy them. Of course we shall. 

October 10 

This is the worst month that I've ever lived through. One eye just weeps all the time. 
That's because the dormitory girls will be homesick. The other is so clear that it makes 
the red one show up dreadfully. Why do I have to be thus divided ? 

October 15 

I don't understand why these instructors persist in treating me as if I really had a lot 
to learn. Did n't I have first rank in pretty nearly every high school that my assembled 
parts have congregated from? I like Home best. 

November 6 

College is too lovely. I'd never go anywhere else. The Junior President called a class meeting 
to-day. The whole class went. Some of the Sophomores too, only thev stayed under the plat- 
form. The President told us how glad she was to see us and all that, then she said we must 
elect a temporary chairman. We were waiting for the votes to be collected when up jumped 
the gi*eatest number of Sophomores. We tried to hold the door, but we were n't sure what 
they were going to do, so they carried off the Junior President. Then they taunted, "Your 
class meeting's all over and broken up." We hustled them out while the votes were being 
counted. Two girls got up and shrieked, "Keep your seats. Let's outdo them." And we 
did. I laughed an awful lot that night. 

November 28 

I've changed. So many girls with dark eyes have left that mine are fully three shades lighter. 

We had another class meeting. All serene this time. Jessie Moore is President. 

[53] 



SIMMONS COLLEGE : THE 1908 CLASS BOOK 

December 22 

I'm dreadfully excited. We had a fire just behind Simmons Hall right in the middle of 
the night. We tried to pack. All our best shirtwaists, jam mable dresses, and Pearl Wood- 
ward's cataloguing cards went in first, until we found that we had time to drop our shoes 
in on top. The Dean and the President served tea when it was all over to calm us, and the 
Tech boys gave a serenade. 

March 18, 1905 

How much vinegar and pepper and molasses haven't I swallowed? The Sophomores in- 
vited us to a kid party. 'Course I went back to Dutch cuts, socks, and short skirts to please 
them. I think they wished that they could do it as well. 

April 19 

Freshman Frolic last night. Heaps of fun. Some of the girls were n't eating candy on ac- 
count of Lent, so the others had more; but it's all the same to me. I'm the average of all. 

June 12 

One year all gone ? It does n't seem possible, and yet I feel as if I had lived three years in- 
stead of one. 

\ 

September 22, 1905 

It's so much nicer to nod your head and say, "How do you like it? Don't be scared." 

October 8 

Class meeting. So different from the first one last year. Jessie Moore again. She served us 

well. 

November 12 

The Freshmen had their first meeting to-day. I sort of wanted to disturb them, but, poor 

things, they're having an awfully hard time. 

November 18 

Such a fight! My head splits from exhaustion. No one liked any of the class pins, and the 

committee could n't find another presentable one in the stores. We positively had to have 

one then and there. I think I won't put it all down. Girls don't like exact reproductions 

sometimes. 

March 15, 1906 

How much my college career has absorbed my attention ! We tried to give a vote of thanks 
to the Seniors for their entertainment, but there was so much discussion about the date 
that the motion was lost. 

March 21 

The Seniors said we need n't bother. Kind of them when it was on us. 

We have a class song now. I feel really proud. A song to me! 

[ 54 ] 



CLASS HISTORY 

May 10 

I've been on the Inquisition racks for History 1. First I'm doubled up to represent Henry 
the Eighth to see how that feels, then I'm stretched out to Charles the Second. When 
I'm off, I'm supposed to be contrasting the situations in a ten-page theme. Ough! 

September 21, 1906 

It's so good to be back. I've hugged and kissed myself several times over. 

I'm glad that I can never dissolve. I'd hate to be a part here and another there again. 

Hurrah for 1908 ! 

October 10 

Class meeting to begin with. Jessie once more. We are proud of her. 

A good deal of discussion about Junior Prom., but it's so hopelessly far off! 

October 22 

Economics and History 2 together. Even the wind sighs. I'm afraid my eyes will be green, 

and I'll shrink half a foot. Only the grinds can hold out. 

November 19 

It's queer to sit so far up in Assembly. I never look at the clock now, it's bad for the 

Freshmen. 

January 22, 1907 

The stock exchange so cordially greeted us that we were afraid to approach the curb with- 
out a man. Eco. is certainly interesting, but I wish it were May. 

February 12 

I'm glad that I didn't have to readjust myself once more. I suppose I shan't have to very 

much now, until we are old and shovelled in. 

March 20 

Almost here. O Junior Prom., why don't you come? My dance orders are all made out, the 

plans are decided upon, everything but the day is ready. 

May 1 

This is really Junior week.*Reception to-night at Miss Arnold's. Such good things to eat! 

May 2 

Tea at Simmons Hall — just a tantalizer for to-morrow. 

May 3 

I'll just have to write in my diary before this night is over. It's been the best that lever 
knew. Oh dear, it's gone, though. Everything went off splendidly; yellow daisies are pretty; 
but we can never have it again. 

May 4 

Luncheon and dance. This is a suspension. We shall know to-morrow that it's over forever. 

[ 55 ] 



SIMMONS COLLEGE : THE 1908 CLASS BOOK 

June 11 

This is the first Class Day. I'm going so that I can see how to make improvements for 

ours next year. 

September 21, 1907 

I hate to think that this is my last active year. I shall have to go and take my place be- 
side the two other shades in the darkest corner of the basement, where the broken chairs are 
kept; and I love the light upstairs. 

October 1 

They held the Guild reception to-day. Patty for President. She's a dear. The Freshmen 
were so delighted to have their dance orders filled that they forgot to look distinctive 
enough for us to pick them out afterward. Poor Freshmen! 

October 12 

Class meeting. They seem so natural now. Alice Garland and Margery Boylston. We love 

them all. 

It's dreadful to feel that this will soon be over. 

October 27 

Ethics themes every week. Have I really a soul? What is the basis of moral conduct? 

November 3 

Senior socials all through the year. They're sort of farewell parties each month. Oh dear! 

December 4 

The Library visitors prefer Providence. Worcester is so stretched out; besides, we are sure 

of the Y. W. C. A. for a lunch. 

February 20, 1908 

We all went to Miss Arnold's skating-party, and we did enjoy ourselves. 

March 1 

You surely have heard of the Class Book? Isn't it fun getting ready for Commencement? 
Eve thought about a spread, a dance, a luncheon, a dinner, for ever so long, but really 
our tree must be a magnolia. 

March 7 

This is my last sigh. My reflections upon Commencement are forever lost. 

I hope that the Class believes in spirits now. Anyway, they must believe in me because this 

is my diary exactly as I left it on the third window-sill in the east wing, when Thaddeus, 

burdened with coats, came along and carried it up to the office. 

Grace Liscom Hewett 



[56 ] 



CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

SCHOOL OF HOUSEHOLD ECONOMICS 

Elizabeth Davidson Burleigh Ruth Kellogg 

Marion Cox Jessie Havens Moore 

Beulah Clark Hatch Mary Spalding 

Margaret Remington Havens Lucy Sherwood Stebbins 

Ethel M. Heald Ethel Grace Wooldridge 

SCHOOL OF SECRETARIAL STUDIES 

Gertrude Jane Burnett Alice M. Garland 

Helen Madaeline Callahan Edith Fannie Hood 

Zilla May Constable Beatrice Margery Levian 

Ruth Lane Eaton Martha C. Lowe 

Marion F. Farrington Dora B. Sherburne 

Olive Louise Fiske Helen Avis Strout 

Mary Evelyn Fitzsimmons Martha Wentworth Suffren 

Mary J. Sweeney 

SCHOOL OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Esther Louise Adams Cora Chapin Goddard 

Mertie M. Bachelder Grace Liscom Hewitt 

Stella Sweetser Beal Louise Phillips Hunt 

Eliza B. Bigelow Marion Eliza Jones 

Marion Burrage Theodora Kimball 

Lucy M. Church Anna Elizabeth Monahan 

Emily Ambler Clarke Mary Cogswell Peekham 

Hester Paige Fisher Katherine L. Stegmaier 

Annie Lizzie Flavell Theresa Crystal Stuart 

Lena Ruth French Florence C. Sutherland 

SCHOOL OF SCIENCE 

Margery Boylston Sarah Louise Northrup 

Mary Walker Miller Ruth M. Thomas 



[59] 



FORMER MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1908 



Daisy O. Abbott 

Maud E. Adlington 

Carrie M. Allen 

Margaret Ames 

Louise Andrews 

Mae C. Backes 

May E. Baker 

Grace E. Barnes 

Persis Bartholomew 

Theodate Bates 

Verna Bell 

Grace I. Bishop 

Marion J. Boynton 

Florence A. Brady 

Elizabeth F. Brennan 

Josephine M. Briggs 

Hattie I. Brigham 

Carrol Brown 

Jeannie M. Brown 

Alice E. E. Buff 

Bessie M. Burnham 

Florence Butler (Mrs. Walter Kirk) 

Irene F. Caufield 

Ellen T. Chamberlin 

Bertha A. Chapman 

Mary P. Chapman 

Alice W. Clement 

E. Ethel Closterhouse 

Mary B. Cogan 

Elizabeth Condy 

Grace F. Coombs 

Leslie M. Corbett 

Sarah S. Cottrell 

Katherine A. Cummings 

Helen W. Currier 

Katherine E. Cutter 

Alice M. Deadman 

Sarah E. Dearborn 



Edith W. Dunham 
Bessie L. Ellis 
Ethel A. Fitts 
Jennie C. Fletcher 
Bachel Flint 
Rosina E. Foord 
Emma H. Foote 
Mable O. Fordham 
Alice Frost 
Amy B. Garst 
Mary E. Gibson 
Grace P. Gillett 
Alice G. Goold 
Clover Granger 
Hazel L. Green 
Ada E. Hammond 
Ida G. Hatch 
Marguerite E. Hatch 
Ethel M. Haye 
Carolyn L. Hewitson 
Myrtle H. Hunt 
Ethel M. Johnson 
Fanny M. Johnson 
Bertha W. Josselyn 
Minnie J. Keeney 
Beulah B. Kendrick 
Lena M. Klock 
Gertrude A. Knapp 
Abby A. Knowlton 
Alice A. Laken 
Helen P. Livermore 
Margaret McClure 
Marie J. McCormick 
Esther D. McDonnell 
Margaret A. Mclntyre 
Harriet McLean 
Sarah J. MacLeod 
Marion W. Mansfield 



[ 60 ] 



FORMER MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1908 



Lucy E. Dewey 

Helen S. Miller 

Marjorie R. Monteith 

Agnes V. Morrissey 

Lilian M. Mowat 

Helen J. Niekerson (Mrs. E. H. Sprague) 

Marion W. Nichols 

Hester F. Noble 

Haidee M. Oelkers 

Katherine S. Oiler 

Grace W. Osborne 

Mary L. Overton 

Helena G. Packard 

Ida F. Paine 

Ruth A. Parks 

Leslie M. Parsons 

Helen C. Peck 

Elizabeth H. Pennell 

Pearl L. Perkins 

Annie S. E. Pierce 

Arbella P. Pingree (Mrs. Herbert Chase) 

Marion F. Pink ham 

Clara J. Prouty 

Emma Punchard 

Evelyn L. Rand 

Mary F. Ranger 

Elizabeth Redick (Mrs. Jenkins) 

S. Clah'e Reynolds 

Mildred Rice(Mrs. Sidney Curtis Hardwick) 

Evelyn B. Robertson 

Hester Rose 

Hilda M. Rosencrans 



Bessie F. Millar 

Eleanor Porter-Rudd 

Bertha Safford 

Sadie E. Sawyer 

Clarissa H. Schuyler 

Florence C. Seymour 

Jeannette F. Sherwood (Mrs. Wm. Neilson) 

Frances S. Shute 

Laura C. Simons 

Edith H. Smith 

Florence E. Smith 

Etta J. Snell 

Annie E. Springer 

Alberta H. Stevens 

Nettie E. Swan 

Kathryn Van A. Swift 

Ruth B. Taylor 

Ruth E. Thompson 

Vinnie Tilden 

Elizabeth P. Townsend 

Frances H. Tribou 

Beatrice C. Turner 

Molly Vinal 

Nellie E. Ware 

Grace E. Warren 

Clara H. Wassenich 

Ida M. Waters 

Amy E. AVhite 

Ella A. White (Mrs. Horatio Ford) 

Shirley E. White 

Eleanor J. Worthen 

Allene M. Youngs 



[61 ] 



PROGRAMME 

FOR COMMENCEMENT WEEK 
1908 

June 14 BACCALAUREATE SUNDAY 

Sermon by the Reverend Albert Parker Fitch 
at the Church of the Disciples 

June 15 

Senior Dance at South Hall 

June 16 CLASS DAY 

Class Day Exercises 

Address of Welcome 

Class Prophecy, Will, and Songs 

Planting the Ivy 

Ivy Song 
Glee Club Concert 

June 17 COMMENCEMENT DAY 

Commencement Exercises at Jordan Hall. Address by the 
Reverend Professor James Hardy Ropes, D.D. 

Presidents Reception at South Hall 

June 18 

Senior Luncheon at South Hall 
Alumna? Meeting at North Hall 



[ 62] 



COLLEGE ORGANIZATIONS 



THE STUDENT GUILD 

OFFICERS FOR THE YEAR 1907-8 

president 
Martha Wentworth Suffren, 1908 

vice-presidents 

School of Household Economics: Agnes Martha Best, 1909 

School of Secretarial Studies: Louise L. Heuser, 1909 

School of Library Science: Mabel Williams, 1909 

School of Science: Ruth Bryant, 1909 

SECRETARY TREASURER 

Dora B. Sherburne, 1908 Theodora Kimball, 1908 

THE history of the Student Guild is as yet sufficiently unfamiliar, and sufficiently 
brief, to warrant its repetition here. Founded in the second year of the College, it 
has included in its membership the new students which each succeeding year has brought. 
Its purpose was to weld the student body into one harmonious unit, which should strive to 
accomplish, as an organized force, results which the same number of people could not at- 
tain as individuals. Hence in the past we find the Guild adopting an Honor System for 
conducting examinations; we find it sending delegates, for three consecutive years, to the 
annual conferences of Eastern colleges for women, and in the fourth becoming, with these 
other colleges, a charter member of a permanent organization, "The Women's Inter- 
collegiate Association for Student Government." We find the Guild, at its outset, under- 
taking the support and education of a little girl of eleven, and continuing this work until 
the present year. Throughout the life of the Guild we can trace the continuous work of suc- 
ceeding committees. One, appointed to welcome new students each fall; another, to write 
to and visit members who may be ill; a third, to help those who are in part earning their 
own expenses, by procuring work from other students; a fourth, to care for the bulletin 
boards; a fifth and sixth, to seek fun for the students, and to represent the Glee and Man- 
dolin Clubs of the College. 

Turning from this rapid survey of the Guild in the past, we may look with less assur- 
ance at the work of the present. No one may say what he himself has done, for none can 
see his work in true perspective. That there has been earnest and constant thought ap- 
plied to the problems of the year we do affirm; but we must wait until our year is also a 
year of the past, to judge our effort fairly. 

. [ 65 ] 



SIMMONS COLLEGE : THE 1908 CLASS BOOK 

We have tried to carry forward the beginnings made in previous years, and the general 
plan set forth in the constitution. The changes that have been made are few. With the re- 
acceptance of the Honor System, a more adequate constitution and a more representative 
Honor Committee were adopted. The Assembly has given place to a weekly service in the 
Church of the Disciples, and the old Assembly Room is now used by the students during 
recitation hours for reading or quiet conversation, and at midday for dancing. 

Many times throughout the year the Guild has had to turn to the officers of the Col- 
lege, and would acknowledge, in most grateful terms, the help and sympathy given by 
President Lefavour, by Dean Arnold, and by the members of the Faculty. 

It is hard to lay down our work without a glance ahead to see if we can fathom what 
the coming years will bring. We have worked for the Guild because we feel that its cause 
is good. A number of people, separate, disorganized, opposed, can accomplish but little. 
A group, united, and working with a common aim, can conquer much. The end that the 
Guild should seek is the welfare of Simmons College. 

Martha Wentworth Suffren 

THE COLLEGE HYMN 

Air: Kellers American Hymn 
Hail, Alma Mater! we pledge our love to thee, 
Bring thee our hearts and hands in full loyalty; 
Praising thy counsel and trusting thy truth, 
Lift we our song to thee: oh, guide thou our youth! 
Lift we our song to thee: oh, bless now our youth! 

Make us, thy children, generous and just; 

Send us to labor, when leave thee we must, 

Ready for service and worthy of trust. 

Hail, Alma Mater! thy praises we sing; 
One in allegiance, our tributes we bring. 
Fair shall thy name be, trusted to our care; 
For thy dear sake our lives shall be more fair, 
For thy dear sake our lives shall be more fair. 

Make us, thy children, strong and pure and just; 

Send us to labor, when leave thee we must, 

Ready for service and worthy of trust. 

Sarah Louise Arnold 

[66 ] 



GLEE CLUB 

Irene Granville, 1911, Leader 
Emily A. Clarke, 1908, Manager 



Margery Boylston, 1908 
Emily A. Clarke, 1908 
Hazel E. Cooley, 1910 
Helena de Schweinitz, 1911 



First Sopranos 

frene Granville, 1911 
Ruth A. Harrington, 1910 
Annise B. Kane, 1910 
Cornelia Reese, 1910 



Alice M. Garland, 1908 

Irene Rau, Sp. 

Nellie M. Sargent, 1909 



Second Sopranos 

Judith W. Smith, 1910 
Ilione H. Van Huysen, 1910 
Pearl S. AVoodward, 1908 

First Altos 



Jennie E. Caton, 1908 
Hester P. Fisher, 1908 
Lisabelle Linnell, 1909 



Stella S. Beal, 1908 
Jane Blair, 1910 



Margaret M. Plant, 1911 
Gertrude E. Robson, 1909 
Anna I. Vinton, 1911 

Second Altos 

Jennie M. Simonds, 1911 
Ruth E. Weston, "i9io 
Ethel G. Wooldridge, 1908 



[67] 




MANDOLIN CLUB 

M. Evelyn Fitzsimmons, 1908, Lender 
Olive Louise Fiske, 1908, Manager 

First Mandolins 

May Ayres, 1911 Mabel E. Moston, 1911 

Ruth Raymond, 1909 



Marion Cox, 1908 



Second Mandolins 

Marion F. Farrington, 1908 



Second Violin 
Theresa C. Stuart, 1908 



First Violin 
M. Evelyn Fitzsimmons, 1908 

Guitars 
Olive Louise Fiske, 1908 Adrienne F. Muzzy, 1909 

Piano 
Helen M. Hill, 1908 



[68] 



TENNIS CLUB 

COMMITTEE 

Margaret Remington Havens, '08, Chairman 
Professor Kenneth Lamartine Mark, Faculty Adviser 
Elizabeth Davidson Burleigh, '08 Jessie Havens Moore, '08 

Olive Louise Fiske, '08 Eloise Miles, '09 

Theodora Kimball, '08 Helen Myrick, '10 

Dorothy Hopkins, '11 

THE present year — the second in which we have had the use of our tennis courts — 
has seen increased enthusiasm for our one and only athletic sport. During the autumn 
a Continuous Tennis Tournament was held which lasted to the end of the season, giving 
every girl in the College a chance to enter. This was resumed in the spring term. 

When the spring season opened, a new member was appointed for the committee, chosen 
from the entering class, since it was thought best to have each class represented. The com- 
mittee decided to tax each player a small sum for certain necessary expenses hitherto de- 
frayed by the College. Plans were also carried out for an inter-class tournament. This, the 
first regular tournament ever held in the College, took place May 16, and went off with 
great enthusiasm. The girls and their friends were present in large numbers, and class 
spirit overflowed in songs of encouragement for the various champions. It was determined 
by lot that the classes of 1908 and 1911, and 1909 and 1910, respectively, should play off 
the semi-finals. The final match was played later in the same afternoon between the cham- 
pion of the entering class and the champion of the sophomore class, the latter winning. 
At the close of the tournament, each player was presented with her class numerals, and the 
winner of all, Miss Elmes, received an S. The playing showed a vast improvement over 
that of last autumn. 

Results of the Inter-Class Tennis Tournament, May 16, 1908 

Semi- Finals 
Grace L. Hewett, '08 "\ ^ 



Grace L. Hewett, 08 'l 

c u T v ■ , ic lft11 \ [Sarah H. Le Valley, 0-6, 6-4, 8-6 

Sarah H. Le Valley, special (for 1911) J 

JMa 



Ruth Bryant, 09 

>Mar.iorie Elmes, 6-4, 6-0 
Marjorie Elmes, 10 



M arjorie Elmes, '10 
6-3, 6-2 



Margaret Remington Havens 



[ 69 ] 



OUR DORMITORIES 

THEY were unique, our earliest dormitories, in the Back Bay district. Many of us 
remember our first dinner in the basement of Simmons Hall, when each upper class- 
man took a Freshman by the hand, and informed her as to the way she should go. The 
foremost impression we had was "How kind every one is!" and, at the beginning of our 
new College year, we registered the resolution to emulate the older girls' goodness. 

Looking back now after three years of living in the open Parkway, the life we lived on 
St. Botolph Street seems anomalous. This very characteristic keeps it clear before our 
minds: our irresponsible, cluttered rooms, our difficulties in grasping the Simmons point 
of view as to fun, being but children. 

I doubt if we acquired the College's ideal of serious friendly life during our first year, 
or even our second. Yet during our jolly adjustment to our half-finished "new dorm," we 
began to realize dimly that our positions were changed. At the good times we had had in 
Simmons Hall, we had been considered as guests. Now we commenced to take up responsi- 
bilities as hostesses. Perhaps our pleasantest experience of this sort was our share in the 
decorating for "Junior Prom." We really had a part in the great event of the year, we 
proudly assured one another beforehand, and wouldn't we show them how to do it! 

Some of our number had genius in planning for our numerous small occasions and holi- 
day festivities, so that, by our Junior year, nothing carried on in the dormitories could 
have taken place without us. Considering the staid youth of our College, we have had our 
fair share of merriment, and we have provided ourselves with plenty of additional fun. 

To some of us who had been the only daughters in our homes, the past years have given 
sisters in thoughts and aims. The consummate wish of our class, in going out of the Col- 
lege, is that no future class may forget this simple, kindly attitude toward one another; 
may the girls be friends. 

Now that the time has come for us to leave our College homes after four years of close 
companionship we begin to grow silent, thinking of the separation to come and the autumn 
without the old joyous meeting. We recall our theatre-parties with chaperons, our shop- 
ping trips, our bird-walks, and little excursions; the times we were tired, and every one 
ministered to us; or sad, and every one cheered us; how all things were in common in 
material possessions. That is the spirit of our Simmons College, an attitude of friendliness, 
which gladly includes a stranger in the place. We are a busy people, but we have tried never 
to forget the little kindnesses that make sunny days. As our dear Dean loves to quote, 
"They helped every one his neighbor, and every one said to his brother, Be of good courage." 

Lucy M. Church 
[70 ] 



CLASS SONG 



Air: 

Loyal are our minds and hearts 

To the school that trained our thought; 

Teacher of the useful arts, 

Great achievements she has wrought. 

Young together we have been, 

Striven together to decide 

What our work should be to win 

Ends approved on every side. 

Now we go to prove her worth, 

Make her name known through the earth; 

May we bring some gifts to her, 

Adding to her honor! 



KUlarney 

Four long years have we, a class, 
Lived and worked in one accord, 
Seen both joys and sorrows pass, — 
Now we break the golden cord. 
Friendships formed here we'll ne'er sever, 
Memories cherish ever dear; 
Keep within our hearts forever 
Kindly acts of love and cheer. 
We'll recall our College days 
As we go our different ways, 
Till we bring our gifts to her, 
Sharing in her honor. 

LUCY M. CHURCH 



IVY SONG 



Lovingly now together 

Meet we this gladsome day, 
Voicing a hope for the future, 

E'er we divide our way; 
Leave we a promise of union 

To those whom we go before, 
Sign that our hearts to our dear halls, 

Like ivy, shall cling evermore. 



Hopefully then together 

Plant we this ivy vine; 
Long may its growing tendrils 

These honored walls entwine; 
Long may it flourish in beauty, 

Symbol of strength and peace, 
And with its growth, as years pass by, 

So shall our love increase. 



THEODORA KIMBALL 



A PRAYER 



O merciful, loving Father, 
Hear Thy children's prayer; 

Standing in youth and sunshine, 
O keep us a moment there ! 



Guide us, strengthen us, chasten us, 

If so we perfected be ; 
Draw us, Holy Father, 

Nearer unto Thee. 



Keep us bright and gladsome, 
Holy in Thy sight, — 

O merciful loving Father, 
Hear our prayer to-night. 

[73] 



L. H. H. 



SIMMONS COLLEGE : THE 1908 CLASS BOOK 

NINETEEN-EIGHT 

As we join together, classmates, The fame of our Alma Mater 

In this our song of praise, Throughout the land has spread ; 

To our dear old nineteen-eight We will always love and serve her 
Let each her voice now raise Where'er life's path we tread. 

To sing abroad the glory We will sing abroad the glory 

Of the class we all adore, Of the class we all adore, 

To tell of growing friendships And our love for Alma Mater 

Which shall bind us more and more. Shall each year be more and more. 

NELLIE E. WARE 

Ode to the West Wind 

O wild West Wind, thou breath o'er all the Fenway, 
Thou, from whose unseen presence the waste papers 
Are driven, to hang upon the bushes, flapping, 
All crumpled, gray, and torn and dirty white, 
Pestilence-stricken multitudes: O thou, 
Who chasest in their disconcerting flight 
The veiled hats, where they do mock and bow 
Each like an imp, far-fleeing with pursuit, 
While tangled locks redouble our dismay; 
O thou who spreadst the whirling dust, and fillst 
(Driving sweet maids, like plants, to feed on air) 
With living germs and odours, marsh and fen; 
Wild Spirit, which art moving everywhere; 
Destroyer and Offender; heai% O hear! 

T. K. AND G. L. H. 



Wail of a Simmons Librai~y Senior 

CouNT-count-count-count the pages in the books with care; 
If-your-hands-stop "they" will plainly speak to you — 
(Books-books-books-books, pile 'em up and down again!) 
There's no ease-up in the work! 

Don't-don't-don't-don't look at what's ahead of you — 
(Books-books-books-books, pile 'em up and down again!) 
Girls-girls-girls-girls-girls get mad at c'llating 'em, 
An' there's no ease-up in the work. 

[74] 



VERSE 

Seven-six-eleven-five-nine-an'-twenty things to-day — 
Eour-eleven-seven teen-thirty-two the day before — 
(Books-books-books-books, pile 'em up and down again !) 
There's no ease-up in the work! 

L. R. F. 

MEDLEY 

1906 
Air: "Everybody Works but Father'''' 

Everybody works at Simmons, everybody works like mad; 
Everybody crams and studies, everybody's worn and sad. 
See the Freshmen hustle ! See the Sophs all work ! 
See the Juniors worry ! and the Seniors never shirk! 
Everybody works and struggles; life's one long hard fight; 
Everybody works at Simmons from morn till night. 



Air: "Indians on Broadway' 1 '' 

Though we work and worry, yet sometimes, you know, 

German, French, and Spanish, we just let them go; 

And College all forgotten, we just spend a happy hour, 

Till those absence blanks we think of with their awful haunting power. 



Air: "In Dear Old Georgia" Air: "Silvery Mohaxok" 

At our dear College, life's free from care, Hush! 'T is a sacred place we enter; 

Out on our campus so wondrous fair; 'Tis the spot where we must mute and silent 

Her walks so verdant, her paths so green, Don't forget to walk on tiptoe, [be; 

Her trees so shady, her lakes serene. Don't forget to whisper low ; 

This is Assembly Hali,, you know. 



Air: "Little Girl, You'll Do" 

If your head's not full, if your brain's not clear, 

If you love to shirk, if you hate to work, 

Then, I pray you, don't come here; for it's very queer, 

But you 11 flunk, yes, you'll flunk, and you'll flunk most awful. 



[75 ] 



SIMMONS COLLEGE : THE 1908 CLASS BOOK 

If you're fond of golf, if you're in for sports, 

If you spend your time on the tennis courts, 

Then, I pray you, don't come here; for it's very clear 

That you'll flunk, yes, you'll flunk, and you'll flunk most awful. 



Am: "Dinah and Sambo'''' 

Seniors say to Juniors, "Do you love us?" 

Juniors answer back, "Ah! pretty well." 
Seniors question Sophomores, "But you love us?" 

Sophomores slyly answer, "Hard to tell." 
Seniors ask the Freshmen, "What do you think?" 

Freshmen quickly answer, "Dassn't tell." 
Seniors turn to Seniors, "Do you like us?" 

Seniors cry in chorus, "Mighty well." 



Am: "Soldiers' Field" 

Let us sing in loving chorus 
Simmons" praise to-night, 
Heart and voice alike responding 

To our standard bright. 
Let us evermore be faithful, 
Gold and blue adore; 
So sing, sing, sing, 
And your homage bring 
To Simmons, for evermore. 



MEDLEY 

1907 

Air: "Just my Style" 

You will find it on the bulletin, 

Just a card that bears your name, 
And you need n't turn it over 

For they're printed all the same. 
It will make you halt and wonder, 

It will make you stop and sigh; 
It's a notice from the Dean — 

You must tell her "Why." 



Air: "Experience" 

The Dean said, "Dear, your marks, I fear, 

Show you have not been studying much of late; 

I fear that you, yes, you, 

Will meet a dreadful fate." 

Said I, "Dear Dean, I'll look out now, 

Before it is too late, and fool that dreaded fate; 

For I've good sense, 

For I've had experience." 



[76] 



VERSE 

Air: "Fm Tired, so very Tired'''' 

That bouillon! That nice hot bouillon! 

How good it tastes when we are worn and sad; 
That bouillon! That nice hot bouillon! 

If 'twould only give us brains we never had! 



Air: "My Irish Rosie"" 

Silence, keep silence, 

This is the rest room, 
Don't dare speak out loud; 

If you must breathe here, 

Go and get leave, dear, 
Breathing is not allowed. 

Close your eyes tightly, 

Don't look about you, 

Looking might cause a stir; 
Fold your hands, and do not speak 

a word; 
If you wink, go where you can't be 
heard. 

Here, peace and rest endure. 



Air: "Any Rags' 1 '' 

That Dump! 
Oh! won't somebody clear it away! 

That Dump! 
How we hate to go by every day. 
If they'd only ask us what we'd like, 
We'd say, "Take that old dump out of 
sight!" 

That Dump! 
If they'd only sow grass-seed around 

That Dump! 
If they 'd let a few roses abound ! 
We will bless the day when they clear it 

away, 
And turn that Dump to a garden gay. 



Air: "Dreaming" 

Cramming, cramming, talking in our sleep, 

Dreaming we're in Mid-years, 

Where misery is cheap; 

When we awake, things are not what they seem, 

We thought we'd passed them all, 

But it was just an idle dream. 



[77 ] 



GRINDS 

Professor Parker: "One should create in one's class a spirit of rest-less-ness, rather than 
one of qui-es-cence." 

Professor Kingsbury {arriving nine and seven eighths minutes late) : "Has the class gone?" 
Dr. Dewing: "Well, Miss A, what do you think is the basis of moral conduct?. . . . M'm'm. 
.... That's very interesting M'm'm." 

Professor Nichols: "Love at first sight — a very common phenomenon." 

Mr. Bolton (in History of Libraries) : "Is there anyone who has n't been called on enough?" 

Professor Robbins: "Ornithology, see Birds." 

Professor Goodell: "What are my chances for the Senior Dance?" 

Miss Donnelly: "I have not a D. C. conscience." 

Mr. Moyer, conducting a recitation in Accounts 2: 

Student. "Did you say to endorse a check lengthwise?" 

Instructor. "There seems to be some misunderstanding of the word 'across' {sketching 
the endorsement of a check); you can walk across a field lengthwise." 
Professor Stiles, during a lecture on the Synapses of the Brain, is explaining the cause of 

dreams: 

Student. "Is that why you talk in your sleep?" 

Professor. "Well — ah — isn't that a little personal?" 

Miss Sacker: "Be careful to get your disposition right." 

Professor Campbell (to student who is explaining the condenser, and describing the tin-foil 
as extending to the edge of the pane of glass) : "No, we can't have that, because then we 
should have sparking 'round the corner." 

Dr. Ogg: "Is there any other question?" 

Professor Eldridge (zvho is defining wove paper): "There are little lines running across 
it, going in all directions the same way." 

Dr. Underwood: "I shall have to close five minutes early to-day." 

Professor Norris (in Chemistry recitation): "Miss er-er-er — Smith! What are the funda- 
mental principles underlying this reaction?" 
Student. . . . . 
Professor. "Fine! Fine!" 

Professor Farley: "Allusions — a-1-1 — a — a/lusions." 

Miss Arnold: "Let's all take hold of hands and work together." 

Professor Sedgwick: "Why is it better to drink boiled water than fresh? Because it is 
better to be a cemetery than an aquarium." 

President Lefavour: "I was reading last night an article which is coming out in one of 
our magazines — the Delineator." 

[78] 



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